A Legal Blog by Aaron | Sanders, PLLC


WOO! What Bachelorette Parties in Nashville Can Teach You About Trademarks and Trademark Registrations

A PEDAL TAVERN by Any Other Name Would Still Be as Annoying

On my way back to Nashville (from Los Angeles) last week, I found myself in the back of the plane with not one, but two bachelorette parties. It wasn’t quite noon (Pacific time), but several of the members were already pretty drunk, and they all had a grand time. You might assume that I was just really unlucky, but when you consider how many bachelorette parties there are at any one time in Nashville, and that almost all have to fly into Nashville, you’d conclude that it was amazing I hadn’t encountered two on the same plane before.

Now, I don’t want to say anything bad or dismissive about bachelorette parties, even though we all find them a trifle annoying. They constitute 16.67% of the overall Nashville economy and give rise to about 20% of all civil lawsuits here, so it’s sort of important that we bite our tongues and tolerate them. Without them, the local AirBNB market would collapse, which would hurt the market for tearing down old homes and replacing them with two-towers-on-a-single-lot. Bars and honky-tonks would be hurt, and several of them would probably go out…

Read More»

Of Floods, Buses and Copyright Infringement: A Nashville Riddle

Implied “Transition Period” in Software Licenses? Don’t Count on It.

Here in Nashville, we have what might be called a so-so mass transit system. To be fair, Nashville’s layout isn’t very conducive to mass transit. It’s fairly spread out, the roads tend to meander, there are multiple commercial centers, those commercial centers aren’t always very easy to get to, and residential and commercial growth patterns have been in flux.

Still, Nashville has a bus system, the Nashville Metropolitan Transit Authority, which everyone calls the “MTA.” As you might expect, one of MTA’s goals is to make sure the buses run on time, which requires making sure the drivers are there to drive the buses, the correct buses are dispatched on the correct routes. It also involves monitoring how long the buses take between major stops. In 2007, MTA wanted a better system for communications, dispatching and tracking. It contracted with ACS Transport Solutions for this. ACS agreed to sell, install and configure all of the necessary equipment. This equipment required enterprise-level software to run it, and ACS also agreed to license the software to MTA.

For some reason, the software license was in an entirely separate contract called a “License Agreement.”…

May 2, 2010, Nashville, Tennessee. That's downtown in the distance. The MTA depot would actually be fairly close by, probably completely under water.

Read More»