A Legal Blog by Aaron | Sanders, PLLC


Oracle v Google (Part 2): Was it Fair Use?

Bringing Merger in Through the Side Door

This is part 2 in a series (of at least three posts). Part 1 is here.

Regular readers of the IP Breakdown—both of you—will recall a semi-regular feature called Is it Fair Use?, which is a fast-paced game in which I give you a lot of facts and an analogous (and often binding) case, and let you decide whether the use of the copyrighted work was a fair use or not. This game has been sweeping the nation for about four and a half years, apparently in layer of negligible thickness.

My point in this feature is that close fair use determinations are unpredictable because they are based on—at least—four fact-intensive factors that often end up as a kind of cultural value judgment. While many fair-use determinations are pretty easy, the ones that end up being decided by a court are usually pretty hard.

Juries Are Scary.

The fair use issue in Oracle v. Google represented a kind of triple witching. First, it involved fair use. Second, it went to trial. Third, it went to a jury trial. Twice. Most fair-use determinations seem to be made by judges, on summary judgment or even Rule 12(b)(6)—which…

We are Google. This is the Googleplex. The old rules don't apply to us. Also, these cute Android statutes rise at night and suck the innovation out of small companies. Photo by Runner1928.

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