A Legal Blog by Aaron | Sanders, PLLC


Poking Bears and Blocking ISPs

I’m going to post this and then go hide out in a bunker somewhere.  I’m not even sure I can get through the introductory paragraph before needing to take cover.

 

 

SOPA.

 

(Crawling back out from her hiding space under her desk…..)

 

You will all remember the Day the Internet Went Black in protest of the twin legislative boogey men, the Stop Online Piracy Act in the House and the Protect IP Act in the Senate.  The acts were secretly negotiated and quickly drafted attempts to curb piracy and counterfeit from foreign sites by prohibiting U.S. companies from advertising on those sites or processing payments to those sites, or from indexing those sites on search engines. We’re coming up on the 5th anniversary of Protest Day. The primary arguments against the bills were that the DNS blocking provisions would “break the internet,” that it was not narrowly tailored to avoid curbing free speech, that it would chill sites for user-generated content, and that it would generally stifle internet innovation.

The short history is that the bills came out, the Internet went berserk, the Internet went black, and the bill died.  Prior to the demise, those of us who moderated panels on the issue that…

dreamstime_m_48059685

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Cox Rocked, Part 2: What the Jury Said (and Why)

Broadband Isn’t a “Draw” for Infringement, but What About Substantial Non-infringing Uses?

Back in late 2014, two of Rightscorp’s clients, BMG Music and Round Hill Music, sued the cable operator and internet-service provider, Cox Communications, for copyright infringement on grounds that Cox was liable for its users’ sharing of the plaintiffs’ copyrighted musical compositions using the BitTorrent protocol.

What’s Right for Rightscorp

Although it wasn’t a party, the case was crucial to Rightscorp. Rightscorp is in the business of investigating the sharing of copyrighted work over BitTorrent protocol and obtaining modest settlement from the BitTorrent users. For example, if Rightscorp thought you had shared “Bad Blood” using BitTorrent, it would send you a settlement demand of, say, $500—or some figure that’s low enough for you to afford but not high enough to be worth fighting over. It’s a low-return–high-volume business. And for it to work, Rightscorp needed to get as many settlement demands to users as possible.

But to do that, Rightscorp needed the cooperation of ISPs. That’s because Rightscorp doesn’t actually know who the user is. It just knows the user’s IP address at the time of the alleged file-sharing. Only the user’s ISP knows which of its users was using a…

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Cox Rocked but DMCA Safe Harbors Remain Unshaken

All We Really Learned Is that Even Big Corporations Don’t Always Run Things by Counsel.

We have learned quite a lot about the contours of the DMCA safe harbors over the last few years, thanks to record labels swinging for the fences, Viacom and Google’s tenacity in fighting over early-days YouTube, and a rare sighting of a certain kind of “red flag.” But these cases haven’t addressed the fuzziest area of the DMCA safe-harbors: the requirement for a “repeat infringer” policy. As I’ve argued before, this requirement is service providers’ greatest point of vulnerability. Because of the law’s fuzziness, service providers can’t be certain they’re in compliance. What’s more, if they’re, they lose all protection from DMCA safe harbors. But, for some reason, the rights holders have been reluctant to attack it.

To get clarity about a law, you need a case that is forced to address the difficult questions. Remember that courts only rule on the issues presented to them, and their findings and reasoning are only precedential to the extent they are necessary for the court’s decision. Courts don’t give advisory opinions, just because it would help clear things up. Thus, if there’s an easy way and a difficult…

Cox runs its graduated response to copyright infringement out of this trailer, far away from any legal counsel

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My Response to Prof. Menell Regarding the Propriety of Relying on Pre-Enactment Legislative History of the Copyright Act of 1976

Prof. Menell Comments on 15% of My Article; I Respond.

This is the first of a series of blog posts in which I respond, in detail, to the following assertion by Prof. Peter Menell in a recent blog post post made on the Media Institute’s website:
Mr. Rick Sanders also questioned my exploration of legislative history, suggesting that it is improper to consult legislative history predating the enacting Congress. His assertion overlooks Supreme Court opinions in Kirtsaeng, Tasini, CCNV, Abend, Dowling, and Sony [a/k/a “Betamax”] adverting to 1976 Copyright Act legislative history predating the enacting Congress.
Prof. Menell was, indirectly, responding to one (of several) arguments I made in an article I wrote on whether the distribution right includes a “making available” right, i.e., whether just making something (a book or digital song file) available (for sale or download) violates the distribution right. I was, in turn, responding to Prof. Menell’s re-writing of the section of the authoritative treaties on copyright law, Nimmer on Copyright. Prof. David Nimmer, who maintains (and mostly writes) Nimmer on Copyright had previously either (depending on whose recollection you’re using) taken no position on the issue or was leaning against the existence of a “making available” right…

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Is Nimmer & Menell’s “Lost Ark” of Copyright Just a Prop?

Spoiler: Yes.

So, I’m talking about this article of mine that was kindly published by the Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment and Technology Law (“JETLaw”). See part I here. The issue has to do with one of copyright law’s “exclusive rights”—i.e., things only the copyright owner and his or her authorized licensees may do with a copyrighted work—the right to distribute copies of the work to the public, which we’ll just call the “distribution right.” The question is whether the distribution right includes only consummated acts of distribution, or can also include attempts and offers to distribute.* Most (but not all) courts have held that the right is limited to consummated distributions, but rights holders would very much prefer the broader interpretation. The issue used to be academic, but with file-sharing, it matters now because it’s very difficult to detect consummated downloads**, but it’s easy to prove that the unlicensed works were “made available” for download on the file-sharer’s computer.

* Remember that the distribution right has an important exception: the first sale doctrine. Once you legally obtain a physical embodiment of the work, you may dispose of it as you see fit.

** Putting aside what I have…

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