A Legal Blog by Aaron | Sanders, PLLC


Copyright Law Can Spice Up Anything: The Surprising Scope of Copyright Protection

The Thick and Thin of Copyright Protection

Copyright lawyers love tell you that copyright law is all about encouraging creativity because that makes it seem that we’re performing some sort of socially useful activity. We love to point to paintings, novels, movies and music. Without the legal monopoly that copyright law confers on “creators,” these wonderful things wouldn’t be created. Or, at least, they wouldn’t be as good.

And—you know what?—sometimes this is even true! There are lots of cases about music and movies and even dancing!

But you know what else is protected by copyright law? A catalogue of dental procedures. Lists of collectable cards. Medical education brochures (e.g., Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Understanding Your Health.) Private placement memoranda.

What’s a private placement memorandum? So glad you asked. Before you can ask folks to give your enterprise money, you need to provide them with certain information so they can make an informed decision. If you’re providing this information because you’re offering to sell equity or debt, and the transaction is “private,” then you’ll be expected to provide a “private placement memorandum” (or “PPM”). PPMs are not “creative,” in the usual sense of the word. They are designed to inform. Much of the information…

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When Implied Licenses (Don’t) Attack: Copyright Licensor’s Scheme to Ambush His Licensee Goes Terribly Wrong

Today’s Lesson: Don’t Be a %$*!#

A little bit of legal knowledge can be a most troublesome thing.

Readers of The IP Breakdown know that implied copyright licenses are best avoided, particularly if you’re the licensee, though they’re usually considerably better than, well, no license. There are several problems with implied licenses. They’re (by definition) not exclusive, which means your competitors can use the work in question. The scope of the license is undefined. You don’t know what you’re allowed to do with the work in question until a court issues a ruling, by which point—well, things are already in a bad way.

Implied licenses aren’t great if you’re the licensor, either. The lack of definition makes it harder to enforce the license’s terms. You say to your licensee, “Stop doing that or else!” or “Pay up!”—and your licensee says, “Where does it say that?” or maybe even “Come at me.”

Still, before you get too deep into these messy, slippery weeds, you might want to consider a more fundamental legal principle: don’t be a %$*!#. Nobody likes a %$*!#.

The law tolerates a lot of not-nice behavior: sharp-elbowed competition, turning a tenant out of a space with little notice, burdensome contractual provisions that…

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Has There Really Been Fallout from the Blurred Lines Case and What Can Be Done About It?

Giving Credit Where Credit Is Due (or Demanded)

Last week, the Associated Press reported, “More and more, artists are giving credit” to the writers of pre-existing songs “in the wake of the ‘Blurred Lines’ case.” The main point of the article was that songwriters are taking a more cautious approach when they know they have at least been influenced by a particular song and have been giving credit to the writers of the older songs to play it safe. As evidence, the article cited the addition of the Gap Band’s “Oops Upside Your Head” to “Uptown Funk,” the addition of the massively awesome Tom Petty and Jeff Lynne to the credits for Sam Smith’s “Stay With Me”—completely justified, in my view—and the addition the two songwriting dudes from The Fray to the credits for The Chainsmokers’ “Closer” (a song I have never listened to until just now).

That’s hardly overwhelming evidence, particularly since at least two of the additions were really settlements of legal claims before litigation. I don’t know how the Chainsmokers dispute was resolved, but I doubt it was purely voluntary.

Songwriting credit is a big deal because it’s how songwriters get paid. Royalties for a song are divided among…

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Poking Bears and Blocking ISPs

I’m going to post this and then go hide out in a bunker somewhere.  I’m not even sure I can get through the introductory paragraph before needing to take cover.

 

 

SOPA.

 

(Crawling back out from her hiding space under her desk…..)

 

You will all remember the Day the Internet Went Black in protest of the twin legislative boogey men, the Stop Online Piracy Act in the House and the Protect IP Act in the Senate.  The acts were secretly negotiated and quickly drafted attempts to curb piracy and counterfeit from foreign sites by prohibiting U.S. companies from advertising on those sites or processing payments to those sites, or from indexing those sites on search engines. We’re coming up on the 5th anniversary of Protest Day. The primary arguments against the bills were that the DNS blocking provisions would “break the internet,” that it was not narrowly tailored to avoid curbing free speech, that it would chill sites for user-generated content, and that it would generally stifle internet innovation.

The short history is that the bills came out, the Internet went berserk, the Internet went black, and the bill died.  Prior to the demise, those of us who moderated panels on the issue that…

dreamstime_m_48059685

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New DMCA Registration Regime Starts Today. Don’t Delay!

New DMCA Registration Regime Starts Today. Don’t Delay!

Today is the first day to take advantage of the U.S. Copyright Office’s new electronic registration system for DMCA agents Gone are the days of printing out a form, physically signing it, and physically mailing it in, usually accompanied by a fairly large check (over $100). Now, you just create an account (which means picking a user name and password, alas), fill out a fairly simple form, pay a very small fee—currently, $6.00—by credit card, and you’re done. The whole thing can be accessed here.

I just did it for my firm, and it wasn’t that hard. There are only a couple of tricky things. First, you (i.e., your organization or who you’re representing) is the “service provider,” not, for example, your internet service provider. In this context, “service provider” means anyone providing any type of service over the internet, not just traditional last-mile ISPs. Second, you’ll want to include, as “additional names,” any name by which you or your organization might be known. At present, there’s no additional fee for additional names, so there’s no reason to skimp.

Even if You’ve Registered, You Need to Re-register.

Now for the important bit. Today might be the…

Usually, DMCA takedown notifications don't have such nice handwriting.

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